Oh no, Nicola! Nearly six in ten now OPPOSE ‘divisive’ Scottish independence – new poll

IndyRef2: Andrew Marr warns Sturgeon of ‘game over’

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they’ll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

And the survey has also indicated the vast majority believe Scotland’s First Minister should be focusing on facilitating the country’s coronavirus recovery, rather than scheming to break away from the United Kingdom. Campaign group Scotland in Union commissioned Survation to carry out the poll – and the results will make grim reading for Ms Sturgeon.

Asked how they would vote in a future referendum, and once “don’t knows” had been excluded, 58 percent said they would choose to “remain part of the United Kingdom”.

By contrast, 42 percent backed the idea of going it alone.

Significantly, just 37 percent believed there should be a referendum before the end of 2023, the timescale identified by Ms Sturgeon.

Questioned about the three issues which the incoming Scottish Government should prioritise, 50 percent chose NHS and social care, 46 percent economy and jobs, 45 percent COVID-19 recovery, 30 percent education – with just 12 percent identifying independence.

Additionally, many feared the impact a referendum would have on the fabric of Scottish society – 51 percent feared it would make “Scottish society more divided” – with only 34 percent disagreeing.

Pamela Nash, chief executive of Scotland in Union, said: “The new SNP government must listen to the people of Scotland, who are clear that independence is not a priority.

JUST IN: Spain fury – Scotland will get ‘no special treatment’

The very last thing we need right now is more division in our society

Pamela Nash

“It must not treat every vote as a vote for a referendum and must instead focus on the NHS, economy, Covid recovery and education.”

She added: “The very last thing we need right now is more division in our society.”

It was clear the majority of Scots did not want a referendum in the First Minister’s timetable of two-and-a-half years, Mrs Nash stressed.

DON’T MISS
Sturgeon’s hope to build French partnership undermined by fishing fury [EXPLAINED]
David Bowie’s heartfelt appeal for voters to reject independence [EXPOSED]
Nicola Sturgeon shoots herself in foot as SNP’s policy at odd with EU [INSIGHT]

She said: “The recovery period will be long and difficult, and no responsible First Minister would contemplate dedicating time to debating and preparing for another referendum any time soon.

“The responsible thing to do is to bring people together to build a recovery for every community in the UK.”

Ms Sturgeon has wasted little time pushing the case for independence in the wake of the elections, which saw the SNP win 64 seats in the Scottish Parliament – just one short of an overall majority.

Speaking to Boris Johnson yesterday, she claimed a second referendum in seven years was now inevitable, while pledging to work with the UK Prime Minister first to ensure the coronavirus recovery remained on track.

Her spokesman later said: “The first minister made clear that her immediate focus was on steering the country through Covid and into recovery, and that a newly elected Scottish government would work with the UK Government as far as possible on that aim.

“The First Minister also reiterated her intention to ensure that the people of Scotland can choose our own future when the crisis is over, and made clear that the question of a referendum is now a matter of when, not if.”

By contrast, a Downing Street statement made no reference to a so-called IndyRef2.

Instead, Mr Johnson had congratulated Ms Sturgeon on winning ”the largest number of seats in the Scottish Parliament” and “concluded by emphasising the importance of focusing on Covid recovery at this time”, the statement added.

Speaking to Sky News’ Sophy Ridge yesterday, Michael Gove refused to be drawn on whether the UK Government might seek to block another referendum in the courts.

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster said: “To start speculating about this type of legislation or that type of court hearing and all the rest of it, it’s just a massive distraction.

“I’m not interested in going down that blind alley.”

Survation interview 1,037 people living in Scotland aged 16 and over between April 29 and May 4.

Source: Read Full Article